Forensic Engineers and Consultants

Aron Olson

Aron Olson

Aron_Olson_WEB

Aron Olson

P.E. Phone: 803.732.6600 vCard LinkedIn Download CV

Expertise

  • Codes and Standards Research
  • Machine Design and Safeguarding
  • Risk Assessment
  • 3D Scan Imaging
Biography

Aron Olson, P.E., holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of South Carolina and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Packaging Science from Clemson University.

Aron is a member of the ASTM International F13 Committee on Pedestrian / Walkway Safety and Footwear. He is also a skilled user of Solid Works and other computer aided design software.

Aron’s areas of emphasis are machine safeguarding, machinery analysis and three dimensional imaging.

Aron has a background in engineering design with over six years’ experience as a mechanical engineer and machine designer in the gas turbine and medical device industries. He has designed both end-user products and production machinery.

Aron investigates personal injury, product liability and property damage claims and losses involving machinery and equipment in both manufacturing and construction environments.

Aron is experienced with collecting and processing three dimension images of machinery, building interiors and exteriors including structural collapse scenes, fire scenes, vehicles and other scenes and objects related to the forensic analysis of personal injury and property claims.

Qualifications
B.S. in Mechanical Engineering
Gas Turbine and Medical Device Designer
Class B Commercial Driver's License, Passenger Endorsement, Airbrake Certified
Class M Motorcycle Driver's License, Motorcycle Safety Foundation Basic Rider Course
Current Member, American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Licensed Professional Engineer
Recent Posts
Figure 2: A close view of the opening of the heat sealer. A person’s hand will fit in the opening below the guard to the left. Two "Danger" stickers are visible.

Injury Involving Packaging Machinery

From time to time, I and other engineers here at Warren are asked to evaluate a case involving an injury that has been caused by machinery designed to produce or fill packaging. The hazards associated with packaging machinery are often similar to other commonly-used industrial machinery, but packaging machinery has its own voluntary consensus standard […]

Figure 2: A view of some of the undersize anchors used to secure the capstan winch. The anchors at the upper right failed by pulling out of the concrete slab. The one at the lower left failed by bending and pulling out.

Injury Involving a Capstan Winch

Co-Authored with Jeff Warren, PE    A capstan winch uses a mechanically powered rotating cylinder, called a capstan, to apply pulling force through a rope. When the rope is looped around the rotating capstan and tightened, friction between the rope and capstan allows the winch to apply force to pull a load. A typical capstan […]

Figure 2: A Webshare photograph from a scan captured from the safety of a balcony in the workshop. The scanner operator never had to climb directly above the forklift to create the shot in Figure 1. The Webshare user can pan, zoom, and measure from the photograph. The grey target icons represent other scan locations on the ground.

Another Dimension of Engineering, Part 2: Visual Demonstrations Can Clarify the Issue

Co-Authored with John Phillips, PE, CFEI In our last post on 3D scanning, we introduced Warren’s new Faro Focus X 330 three dimensional scanner.  To recap, the Faro scanner combines three dimensional laser measurement with automated photography to capture 360-degree data from the real world. Potential applications include vehicle accident scenes and damaged vehicles, structural […]

Figure 1: A Faro 3D scanner.

Warren Adds Another Dimension of Engineering

Co-Authored with John Phillips, PE, CFEI We at Warren are pleased to announce our recent purchase of a Faro Focus X 330 three dimensional scanner with FARO Scene image processing software. The scanner takes up to 976,000 data points per second and can scan objects at distances to 1000 feet.  The scanner forms a point […]

An example of a non-contacting RFID interlock device. The switch, left, detects when its key, right, is sufficiently close that the guard must be closed. In well-designed interlock systems, the use of a unique RFID key discourages defeat of the system.

Interlocking Guards: A Glossary of Terms Often Used

As a part of Warren’s ongoing blog series on interlocking guards, I’d like to provide a brief glossary of selected terms frequently encountered in the context of interlocking guards. To review, interlocking guards are commonly found on machines that have a hazardous function that needs to be guarded, but frequent access to the danger zone […]

Figure 1: An example of an interlock device with a locking function. The interlocking device attaches a machine, and the key attaches to a movable guard. When the guard is closed, the hazardous function may be started, and the key locks into the slot whenever the hazard is present, preventing the guard from opening.

When does an interlocking guard also need a locking function?

As discussed in a prior blog post, When Does My Industrial Machine Need An Interlocking Guard?, an interlocking guard is a movable guard associated with an interlocking device that causes a hazardous machine function not to operate when the guard is opened. 

Interlocked Guards: A Selected Glossary of Applicable Codes and Standards

A 2012 electronic survey by Control Design magazine found that “hard to know what standards/regulation to apply” was the biggest safety design headache among the industrial machine builders who responded.  Along with the mandatory codes, there are many standards-issuing bodies, and together they have released volumes of guidance on machine safety.

Figure 1: A computer-generated illustration of the “normal” and “drag” forces. In this context, the word normal means “perpendicular to the contact surface”. The drag force is also called the tangential force. The coefficient of friction between the block and the tile equals the drag force divided by the normal force. Since it is a ratio of forces, coefficient of friction is a unitless quantity. For walkway surfaces the static and dynamic coefficients of friction are typically less than 1.

Following the Evolution of Walkway Slip Resistance Standards

In August 2014, I shared some thoughts on the ANSI A137.1-2012 standard titled “American National Standard for Ceramic Tile”. You can read that post here.  Among many other topics, ANSI A137 describes a dynamic coefficient of friction testing procedure for ceramic tiles.

An extremely tight close-up view of the area of origin.  This photograph was produced by a macro lens.   A staple pierced an electrical wire causing a short circuit that resulted in fire.

Top Ten Photography Tips for Field Investigators

Here at Warren, we often rely on photographs provided by our clients to make preliminary assessments of incoming cases.  Since we see quite a few client provided photos, and since we take plenty of photographs ourselves, we’ve developed an eye for what makes a good and useful field investigation photograph.  We’ve also struggled with a […]

Aron Olson, P.E., holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of South Carolina and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Packaging Science from Clemson University.

Aron is a member of the ASTM International F13 Committee on Pedestrian / Walkway Safety and Footwear. He is also a skilled user of Solid Works and other computer aided design software.

Aron’s areas of emphasis are machine safeguarding, machinery analysis and three dimensional imaging.

Aron has a background in engineering design with over six years’ experience as a mechanical engineer and machine designer in the gas turbine and medical device industries. He has designed both end-user products and production machinery.

Aron investigates personal injury, product liability and property damage claims and losses involving machinery and equipment in both manufacturing and construction environments.

Aron is experienced with collecting and processing three dimension images of machinery, building interiors and exteriors including structural collapse scenes, fire scenes, vehicles and other scenes and objects related to the forensic analysis of personal injury and property claims.

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering
Gas Turbine and Medical Device Designer
Class B Commercial Driver's License, Passenger Endorsement, Airbrake Certified
Class M Motorcycle Driver's License, Motorcycle Safety Foundation Basic Rider Course
Current Member, American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Licensed Professional Engineer
Figure 2: A close view of the opening of the heat sealer. A person’s hand will fit in the opening below the guard to the left. Two "Danger" stickers are visible.

Injury Involving Packaging Machinery

From time to time, I and other engineers here at Warren are asked to evaluate a case involving an injury that has been caused by machinery designed to produce or fill packaging. The hazards associated with packaging machinery are often similar to other commonly-used industrial machinery, but packaging machinery has its own voluntary consensus standard […]

Figure 2: A view of some of the undersize anchors used to secure the capstan winch. The anchors at the upper right failed by pulling out of the concrete slab. The one at the lower left failed by bending and pulling out.

Injury Involving a Capstan Winch

Co-Authored with Jeff Warren, PE    A capstan winch uses a mechanically powered rotating cylinder, called a capstan, to apply pulling force through a rope. When the rope is looped around the rotating capstan and tightened, friction between the rope and capstan allows the winch to apply force to pull a load. A typical capstan […]

Figure 2: A Webshare photograph from a scan captured from the safety of a balcony in the workshop. The scanner operator never had to climb directly above the forklift to create the shot in Figure 1. The Webshare user can pan, zoom, and measure from the photograph. The grey target icons represent other scan locations on the ground.

Another Dimension of Engineering, Part 2: Visual Demonstrations Can Clarify the Issue

Co-Authored with John Phillips, PE, CFEI In our last post on 3D scanning, we introduced Warren’s new Faro Focus X 330 three dimensional scanner.  To recap, the Faro scanner combines three dimensional laser measurement with automated photography to capture 360-degree data from the real world. Potential applications include vehicle accident scenes and damaged vehicles, structural […]

Figure 1: A Faro 3D scanner.

Warren Adds Another Dimension of Engineering

Co-Authored with John Phillips, PE, CFEI We at Warren are pleased to announce our recent purchase of a Faro Focus X 330 three dimensional scanner with FARO Scene image processing software. The scanner takes up to 976,000 data points per second and can scan objects at distances to 1000 feet.  The scanner forms a point […]

An example of a non-contacting RFID interlock device. The switch, left, detects when its key, right, is sufficiently close that the guard must be closed. In well-designed interlock systems, the use of a unique RFID key discourages defeat of the system.

Interlocking Guards: A Glossary of Terms Often Used

As a part of Warren’s ongoing blog series on interlocking guards, I’d like to provide a brief glossary of selected terms frequently encountered in the context of interlocking guards. To review, interlocking guards are commonly found on machines that have a hazardous function that needs to be guarded, but frequent access to the danger zone […]

Figure 1: An example of an interlock device with a locking function. The interlocking device attaches a machine, and the key attaches to a movable guard. When the guard is closed, the hazardous function may be started, and the key locks into the slot whenever the hazard is present, preventing the guard from opening.

When does an interlocking guard also need a locking function?

As discussed in a prior blog post, When Does My Industrial Machine Need An Interlocking Guard?, an interlocking guard is a movable guard associated with an interlocking device that causes a hazardous machine function not to operate when the guard is opened. 

Interlocked Guards: A Selected Glossary of Applicable Codes and Standards

A 2012 electronic survey by Control Design magazine found that “hard to know what standards/regulation to apply” was the biggest safety design headache among the industrial machine builders who responded.  Along with the mandatory codes, there are many standards-issuing bodies, and together they have released volumes of guidance on machine safety.

Figure 1: A computer-generated illustration of the “normal” and “drag” forces. In this context, the word normal means “perpendicular to the contact surface”. The drag force is also called the tangential force. The coefficient of friction between the block and the tile equals the drag force divided by the normal force. Since it is a ratio of forces, coefficient of friction is a unitless quantity. For walkway surfaces the static and dynamic coefficients of friction are typically less than 1.

Following the Evolution of Walkway Slip Resistance Standards

In August 2014, I shared some thoughts on the ANSI A137.1-2012 standard titled “American National Standard for Ceramic Tile”. You can read that post here.  Among many other topics, ANSI A137 describes a dynamic coefficient of friction testing procedure for ceramic tiles.

An extremely tight close-up view of the area of origin.  This photograph was produced by a macro lens.   A staple pierced an electrical wire causing a short circuit that resulted in fire.

Top Ten Photography Tips for Field Investigators

Here at Warren, we often rely on photographs provided by our clients to make preliminary assessments of incoming cases.  Since we see quite a few client provided photos, and since we take plenty of photographs ourselves, we’ve developed an eye for what makes a good and useful field investigation photograph.  We’ve also struggled with a […]

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