New Technical Paper on Industrial Spray Paint Booths available through SME

Author

Expertise Includes:

    • Electrical & Mechanical Control Systems
    • Fires & Explosions
    • Gas Fired Equipment & Appliances
    • ICC, NFPA, OSHA Codes & Standards
    • Industrial Processes & Operations

Prior to starting my forensic engineering career at Warren, I spent many years designing, manufacturing and installing industrial process equipment. Much of this equipment dealt with industrial painting systems or thermal processing systems.

These projects were often quite involved and included control systems, conveyors, large structural supports and enclosures, and large HVAC systems. In fact, I still consult with various manufacturers on issues related to paint finishing systems and the design of industrial process equipment.

Recently a new client approached me for advice on the proper selection of velocities in paint spray booths. A paint spray booth is a housing with a specific interior airflow designed to collect paint overspray from the painting operation. Proper paint booth design is important to controlling the fire safety and worker health concerns inherent to paint spraying operations. The proper selection of air flow velocity is vital to paint booth performance.

A view of a paint spray booth interior from a paint system I designed to paint truck chassis.  Air enters the ceiling of the booth, flows down over the workers and truck chassis, and then exits through the floor grates.  A wet scrubber system under the booth floor removed paint overspray from the air prior to exhausting the air to atmosphere.

A view of a paint spray booth interior from a paint system I designed to paint truck chassis. Air enters the ceiling of the booth, flows down over the workers and truck chassis, and then exits through the floor grates. A wet scrubber system under the booth floor removed paint overspray from the air prior to exhausting the air to atmosphere.

To answer this client’s questions about paint booth velocity, I created a white paper that addresses both code related requirements and practical advice on the proper selection of paint spray booth velocities. I’m proud to say that this paper has been accepted by SME (formerly the Society of Manufacturing Engineers) for inclusion in their database of technical papers.   The paper may be downloaded (at a modest cost) from the SME website.

If you are interested in this paper’s contents, please contact me at Warren and I can share its contents with you.

John Holecek, senior consulting engineer at Warren, is a licensed professional engineer in South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Ohio and Virginia and has both a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of South Carolina. A certified fire and explosion investigator by the National Association of Fire Investigators, John has more than 22 years experience in the design of industrial process equipment and is extremely knowledgeable in ICC, NFPA and OSHA codes and standards. He pairs more than 13 years of experience supervising manufacturing operations with deep knowledge in areas such as applied industrial heat transfer in oven design, industrial electrical process and motor control systems, material handling systems and fire protection systems. In addition he’s designed paint finishing systems, and commercial and consumer gas fired cooking appliances. John, who has more than 22 years’ experience managing outside contractors in site safety requirements and installation of industrial process equipment, is well versed in federal and state worker safety and environmental regulations.

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