Forensic Engineers and Consultants

Tag Archive: electrical loss investigation

  1. Congratulations Tom Kelly on CESCP Certification!

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    Congratulations to Tom Kelly for completing his Certified Electrical Safety Compliance Professional designation. The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) program, CESCP, is designed to meet the needs of electrical and safety professionals who oversee electrical safety programs or who manage electricians and other personnel exposed to electrical hazards.

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  2. The Demise of Insulation on Electrical Wiring

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    Unlike fine wines and some types of cheeses, not everything ages well.  Such is the case with the materials used as insulation of electrical wiring.  While the copper metal used as the conductor in many wire types will last virtually forever, the cladding used to protect and insulate the wire allowing electrons to flow to their final destination does not. (more…)

  3. Hidden Heat: The Unseen Hazard of a High Resistance Connection

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    A typical residence can have upwards of 10,000 feet of electrical conductors installed, most of which are buried in the walls, attics and crawlspaces.  A commercial building can have 100,000 to upwards of 1 million feet of electrical conductors.  At each device such as a switch or a receptacle are at least three, and typically six or more connections of these conductors within a junction box.  The connections can be in the form of twisted connectors, screw terminals, push in terminals and crimped connectors.

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  4. Using Historical Weather Data to Investigate Lightning Strike Claims

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    Property damage claims to sensitive electronic equipment due to a direct or nearby lightning strike are frequently difficult to substantiate to a high degree of confidence.  Electrical damage to common consumer electronic equipment (televisions, computers and accessories, wireless routers, telephones, fax machines, electronic security systems, etc.) is most frequently not visible to the naked eye during a physical inspection of the allegedly failed equipment.  So, how do we investigate an electrical loss when an insured claims he has $30,000 worth of non-functioning equipment? (more…)

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