Forensic Engineers and Consultants

Tag Archive: structural engineer

  1. WARREN WEBINAR: “Issues with Breaching the Building Envelope”

    Leave a Comment

    LIVE WEBINAR:
    10/5/21  @ 1 pm EST “Issues with Breaching the Building Envelope” | Presented by George Sanford, P.E., Senior Consulting Structural Engineer

    COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    In this Webinar, we will discuss water entry through a variety of building envelope breaches. Water entry and subsequent wood decay, fungal growth and structural damages as a result from water intrusion can lead to serious property damage and major expenses for all types of property owners. We will discuss the definition of a building envelope, and look at various case studies involving breaches to the major components of the envelope. These major components include foundations, exterior walls, and roofs. The foundation case studies include issues with slabs-on-grade, crawlspaces, and basements. The exterior wall case studies involve improperly installed building wrap, leaking windows, and problems with stucco. The roof case studies look at issues with various roof coverings, vents, and penetrations. Participants will take away a thorough understanding of what defines the building envelope, how breaches to the envelope can occur, and how to identify root causes.

    SIGN UP TODAY:
    https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7353113071292131087

    This course is intended to educate and refresh attendees on definitions and key terms often used in construction defect and water intrusion type property claims. We will also be covering important materials that are used in construction of homes and building facilities and how they are helpful to resolving property claims.

    BIOGRAPHY: Senior Consulting Structural Engineer George Sanford is a Licensed Professional Engineer in multiple states. He has over 30 years of applied structural engineering experience specializing in building design, building components, and foundation design. George holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from North Carolina State University in Raleigh, North Carolina.

    George has an extensive background in residential, commercial, and industrial structures and foundations. Throughout his career, George has designed and analyzed structures, supervised engineers, and prepared construction documents (drawings and specifications).

    George has an in-depth knowledge of many building codes, standards, rules, and regulations including the agencies that govern and provide guidance to building designers such as the International Code Council (ICC), and the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI). He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), American Concrete Institute (ACI), American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), Concrete Reinforcing Steel Institute (CRSI), International Code Council (ICC), and the Structural Engineering Institute (SEI).

    REGISTER TODAY: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7353113071292131087

  2. Moisture Intrusion into Concrete Slabs-on-Grade

    Leave a Comment

    Scenario:  A young couple is excited about buying their first home.  They pick it out from a catalog of house plans from the developer of a new neighborhood in town.  It will be a brand new construction starter type bungalow home on a slab-on-grade foundation.  For a cost adder, which is considerable to them, they decide to upgrade the finished flooring from carpeting to hardwood laminate.  Unfortunately, after only a few weeks of residency, the hardwood planks begin to buckle and separate from the slab throughout the house.  They do not know what is causing it, or what to do to remedy it, (more…)

  3. Installation of Structural Sheathing on Wood-Framed Structures

    Leave a Comment

    The facts presented in this blog lead to an interesting story.  During the heyday of the residential construction boom in coastal South Carolina circa 2005, many General Contractors were forced to go out-of-state to find framers and other subcontractors due to the demand creating a local labor shortage.  It turned out that the state of Texas had excess capacity and availability of framers and carpenters. Many Texas framing crews came to South Carolina to satisfy the shortage.  It soon became apparent that the Texas crews, many of which were from inland locations, were accustomed to installing 4’x8’ exterior wall sheathing with the long dimension vertical, i.e., parallel to the studs.  It is especially important and required that the long dimension be oriented perpendicular to the studs.  Laboratory testing has shown that (more…)

  4. Uplift and Shear Restraint Techniques for Residential Structures in Hurricane Wind Zones

    Leave a Comment

    Hurricane and Tropical Storm strength wind forces can wreak havoc on wood-framed residential structures.  One of the primary hazards is the negative pressures which can develop on the exterior building envelope when the structure is subjected to the high encircling winds.  These negative pressures act like the suction of a giant vacuum on a dwelling’s roof diaphragm, which produces enormous uplift forces throughout the entire structure.  The leeward walls are also subjected to negative pressures, while the windward walls take the brunt of the positive wind pressures.  The uplift on the roof is caused by what the author dubs “the airplane wing effect”.  In other words, (more…)

  5. Major Causes of Wood Truss Failures

    Leave a Comment

    Wood truss failures can vary and identifying the cause requires visual inspection as well as a working knowledge of the structural loads and building codes. These truss systems must transfer the gravity and lateral loads to the foundations. Consequently, the framing system and the foundation provide strength and stability for a structure. The most common type of wood-framed construction uses roof trusses, exterior and interior load-bearing walls, beams, girders, posts, and floor framing to resist the gravity and vertical loads. This type of wood-framed construction engages a system of horizontal diaphragms (roof and floors) and shear walls (vertical exterior sheathed walls) to resist the lateral loads. (more…)

  6. What You May Not Know About Using a Concrete Test Hammer

    Leave a Comment

    When assessing potential problems in concrete structures, consider a non-destructive test using the concrete test hammer, AKA “rebound hammer,” before investing a lot of time and money needlessly replacing or destructively testing the concrete structure.  The use of rebound hammer tests should be considered before you or your client decide to drill multiple core samples. Large areas of the concrete structure suspected of having potential strength problems can be tested quickly with a rebound hammer.  Analysis of those results can narrow down specific areas for more rigorous testing. (more…)

  7. Why the Structural Load Path MUST be Considered During Renovation to Prevent Property Damage

    Leave a Comment

    Understanding the structural load path is imperative when considering renovations in a home that may require the removal of a load-bearing wall. Some homeowners consider adding a new door or window opening and worry if the structure will collapse. Another reason could be that the owner wants an open concept floor plan. The goal is to remove walls and open their living space. (more…)

  8. When the Walls Come Tumbling Down… Retaining Wall Basics

    Leave a Comment

    A wall is really boring until it fails. A retaining wall is supposed to hold back soil to either support a structure or keep a space clear. When it fails, both of those roles are compromised. A retaining wall does not have to collapse to fail. In fact, a failure is perhaps better defined as when the wall does not perform as expected. (more…)

  9. Catastrophic Weather – Lessons Learned

    Leave a Comment

    In recent years, with Hurricane Ike in Galveston, TX in 2008 and Superstorm Sandy along the New Jersey and New York coastline in 2012, we have had the opportunity to see firsthand the destructive power of storms like these.  We were “boots on the ground” literally days after the initial coastal strike.  The damage observed to residential and commercial structures was far reaching, diverse and some preventable.  We want to share some “lessons learned” from these observations for these two CAT events. (more…)

Type ofLoss

Not sure what you're looking for?
Browse All

Select Loss Category