Forensic Engineers and Consultants

Amy Anderson

Amy Anderson

Amy Anderson

B.S.Ch.E., P.E., CFEI Phone: 803.732.6600 Cell: 864.505.8452 LinkedIn Download CV

Expertise

  • Commercial Kitchen Fires
  • Fire Protection Systems
  • Industrial Process Hazards
  • Fire Suppression Systems
  • Scope of Damage/Cost of Repair
  • Fires & Explosions Analysis: Origin & Cause
  • Combustible Dust Explosions
  • Codes & Standards Analysis
Biography

Senior Consulting Engineer Amy Anderson has over 20 years of property loss prevention engineering and experience specializing in fire protection. Amy graduated from Clemson University with a degree in Chemical Engineering and is a licensed Professional Engineer in Fire Protection as well as a Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator.

Amy has an extensive engineering background with experience evaluating a variety of buildings and occupancies, and advising clients on the prevention of property and business loss. While specialized in the evaluation of diverse chemical facilities, Amy is equally confident in textile plants, plastic production plants, warehouses, metal working facilities, commercial kitchens, offices and hospitals.

Amy regularly investigates property damage claims involving fire protection systems and their potential failures. She consults with representatives of property owners, fire protection system installers, and fire protection inspection and service companies. Amy also evaluates system failures in dust collectors and other dust handling equipment that result in fires, explosions, or deflagrations.

Amy has an in-depth knowledge of many fire protection codes and standards including NFPA, ICC, and FM Global. She is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, National Association of Fire Investigators, National Fire Protection Association, and the Society of Fire Protection Engineers.

Qualifications
B.S. in Chemical Engineering
Experience in Fire Protection & Suppression Systems
Experience in Fire Detection & Alarm Systems
Experience in Combustible Dust Hazards Evaluation
Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator
Applied Engineering Experience – over 20 years
Fire Protection Engineering
Current Member, National Association of Fire Investigators
Recent Posts

Know a Fire Sprinkler, Like a Boss – Part 2

In Part 1, we looked at the basic parts of a fire sprinkler and took a closer look at other parts including heat responsive elements, wrench bosses, and kick springs. In this part, we’ll look at k-factors and deflectors. K-Factor and Orifice Size K-factor is a characteristic that relates water pressure to flow rate from […]

Know a Fire Sprinkler, Like a Boss – Part 1

In this blog we’ll take a look at the basic and some of the less-known parts of fire sprinklers, with more to come in a later post. Here are the basic parts of the fire sprinkler, shown on a pendent glass bulb sprinkler and an upright solder element (“fusible link”) sprinkler:   Let’s take a […]

GREASE Is The Word…Ensuring Proper Functioning of Wet Chemical Fire Protection Systems in Commercial Cooking Operations

Cooking equipment is the leading cause and is responsible for over half of fires in eating and drinking establishments (see Warren expert Chad Jones’ 2020 blog, Structure Fires in Eating and Drinking Establishments, for further reading on fire causes and NFPA 96 on duct inspection and cleaning). Fire extinguishing systems are also routinely provided over […]

When a DRY Fire Sprinkler System Leaves You Soaked

In my previous blog , I discussed the most basic and most common fire system type: wet sprinkler systems. The possible failure areas discussed with wet systems will also apply to dry sprinkler systems (control valves closed, obstructions, issues in the system, installation, or deficiencies with inspection, testing, and maintenance). Dry systems are even more […]

When a Fire Sprinkler System Fails to Deliver

After a major fire, it is necessary to investigate the fire sprinkler system to see if and why it malfunctioned. Wet sprinkler systems are the most common and least complex fire sprinkler systems in use. The following are major items addressed in an investigation involving a wet system. If available, drawings of the supply piping […]

Senior Consulting Engineer Amy Anderson has over 20 years of property loss prevention engineering and experience specializing in fire protection. Amy graduated from Clemson University with a degree in Chemical Engineering and is a licensed Professional Engineer in Fire Protection as well as a Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator.

Amy has an extensive engineering background with experience evaluating a variety of buildings and occupancies, and advising clients on the prevention of property and business loss. While specialized in the evaluation of diverse chemical facilities, Amy is equally confident in textile plants, plastic production plants, warehouses, metal working facilities, commercial kitchens, offices and hospitals.

Amy regularly investigates property damage claims involving fire protection systems and their potential failures. She consults with representatives of property owners, fire protection system installers, and fire protection inspection and service companies. Amy also evaluates system failures in dust collectors and other dust handling equipment that result in fires, explosions, or deflagrations.

Amy has an in-depth knowledge of many fire protection codes and standards including NFPA, ICC, and FM Global. She is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, National Association of Fire Investigators, National Fire Protection Association, and the Society of Fire Protection Engineers.

B.S. in Chemical Engineering
Experience in Fire Protection & Suppression Systems
Experience in Fire Detection & Alarm Systems
Experience in Combustible Dust Hazards Evaluation
Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator
Applied Engineering Experience – over 20 years
Fire Protection Engineering
Current Member, National Association of Fire Investigators

Know a Fire Sprinkler, Like a Boss – Part 2

In Part 1, we looked at the basic parts of a fire sprinkler and took a closer look at other parts including heat responsive elements, wrench bosses, and kick springs. In this part, we’ll look at k-factors and deflectors. K-Factor and Orifice Size K-factor is a characteristic that relates water pressure to flow rate from […]

Know a Fire Sprinkler, Like a Boss – Part 1

In this blog we’ll take a look at the basic and some of the less-known parts of fire sprinklers, with more to come in a later post. Here are the basic parts of the fire sprinkler, shown on a pendent glass bulb sprinkler and an upright solder element (“fusible link”) sprinkler:   Let’s take a […]

GREASE Is The Word…Ensuring Proper Functioning of Wet Chemical Fire Protection Systems in Commercial Cooking Operations

Cooking equipment is the leading cause and is responsible for over half of fires in eating and drinking establishments (see Warren expert Chad Jones’ 2020 blog, Structure Fires in Eating and Drinking Establishments, for further reading on fire causes and NFPA 96 on duct inspection and cleaning). Fire extinguishing systems are also routinely provided over […]

When a DRY Fire Sprinkler System Leaves You Soaked

In my previous blog , I discussed the most basic and most common fire system type: wet sprinkler systems. The possible failure areas discussed with wet systems will also apply to dry sprinkler systems (control valves closed, obstructions, issues in the system, installation, or deficiencies with inspection, testing, and maintenance). Dry systems are even more […]

When a Fire Sprinkler System Fails to Deliver

After a major fire, it is necessary to investigate the fire sprinkler system to see if and why it malfunctioned. Wet sprinkler systems are the most common and least complex fire sprinkler systems in use. The following are major items addressed in an investigation involving a wet system. If available, drawings of the supply piping […]

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