Forensic Engineers and Consultants

Blog Posts by: The Warren Team

Warren Welcomes George Sanford, Structural Engineer

Warren is pleased to announce that George Sanford, P.E. has joined our team as an engineer specializing in structural issues, building envelope performance, and construction defect investigations.

George brings over 20 years of applied structural engineering experience with a strong background in residential, commercial, and industrial structural design to Warren. George’s past experience has included structural design for single family residences and condominiums in coastal wind and flood zones, foundation design for large industrial structures, and the design of marine structures including docks, bulkheads, and retaining walls.  George works out of the Warren main office near Columbia, SC.

With the addition of George, Warren broadens its pool of talent in the engineering and consulting fields:

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Structural Engineering
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Collision Reconstruction
  • Safety Consulting

See George’s biography for more career specifics, knowledge, and the expertise he adds to our consultant roster.

Please feel free to call us any time to discuss George’s qualifications or any other matter in which we may help you.  Warren appreciates your business and we look forward to serving you in the near future.

George Sanford, PE, holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from North Carolina State University in Raleigh, North Carolina. George has more than 20 years of applied structural engineering experience specializing in residential, commercial, and industrial structures and foundations. Throughout his career, George has designed and analyzed structures, supervised engineers, and prepared construction documents (drawings and specifications).  He has an in-depth knowledge of many building codes, standards, rules, and regulations including the agencies that govern and provide guidance to building designers such as the International Code Council (ICC) American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCI), Steel Joist Institute (SJI) and the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI).

Congratulations Tom Kelly on CESCP Certification!

Congratulations to Tom Kelly for completing his Certified Electrical Safety Compliance Professional designation. The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) program, CESCP, is designed to meet the needs of electrical and safety professionals who oversee electrical safety programs or who manage electricians and other personnel exposed to electrical hazards.

Read More

Major Causes of Wood Truss Failures

Wood truss failures can vary and identifying the cause requires visual inspection as well as a working knowledge of the structural loads and building codes. These truss systems must transfer the gravity and lateral loads to the foundations. Consequently, the framing system and the foundation provide strength and stability for a structure. The most common type of wood-framed construction uses roof trusses, exterior and interior load-bearing walls, beams, girders, posts, and floor framing to resist the gravity and vertical loads. This type of wood-framed construction engages a system of horizontal diaphragms (roof and floors) and shear walls (vertical exterior sheathed walls) to resist the lateral loads. Read More

What You May Not Know About Using a Concrete Test Hammer

When assessing potential problems in concrete structures, consider a non-destructive test using the concrete test hammer, AKA “rebound hammer,” before investing a lot of time and money needlessly replacing or destructively testing the concrete structure.  The use of rebound hammer tests should be considered before you or your client decide to drill multiple core samples. Large areas of the concrete structure suspected of having potential strength problems can be tested quickly with a rebound hammer.  Analysis of those results can narrow down specific areas for more rigorous testing. Read More

Construction Techniques to Prevent Water Penetration at Windows

Windows, and their interface with the exterior walls, are an important part of a building’s envelope that resists the intrusion of water. Most builders take many precautions to protect a house from water damage. One of the most important factors in keeping the water out is the installation of window flashing, a thin material that prevents water from seeping in around a window. Read More

Why the Structural Load Path MUST be Considered During Renovation to Prevent Property Damage

Understanding the structural load path is imperative when considering renovations in a home that may require the removal of a load-bearing wall. Some homeowners consider adding a new door or window opening and worry if the structure will collapse. Another reason could be that the owner wants an open concept floor plan. The goal is to remove walls and open their living space. Read More

When the Walls Come Tumbling Down… Retaining Wall Basics

A wall is really boring until it fails. A retaining wall is supposed to hold back soil to either support a structure or keep a space clear. When it fails, both of those roles are compromised. A retaining wall does not have to collapse to fail. In fact, a failure is perhaps better defined as when the wall does not perform as expected. Read More

Danger Lurking in the Hot Tub

Several dangers involving the use of a hot tub (spa) may readily come to mind, such as the risk of shock or electrocution, or the risk of drowning for unsupervised young children.  Not so readily apparent is the effect of overheating the human body, or “hyperthermia”.

Some individuals are more susceptible to the effects of hyperthermia, including the elderly, young children, and those in poor health.  The effects of hyperthermia, or overheating of the human body, cause direct responses such as headache, nausea, heat exhaustion, increased cardiac output, lethargy, confusion, heat stroke and unconsciousness.  The onset of hyperthermia is defined as being at 99.5° F; if the body temperature reaches 104° F, a life-threatening medical emergency exists.  Read More

Wood Deck Safety Check

Springtime is here! That means we’ll be looking around the house and making a priority list of spring-cleaning projects.  And, for many of us, giving our wood decks a good cleaning gets put at or near the top of the list.  That’s all well and good, however, we should take it a little further and put checking out how safe and secure are our wood decks, particularly those that are built several feet or more above grade. Read More

Water Damage from Leaking Shower Stalls

Have you ever had to have a leaking shower pan for a tiled shower stall replaced, only to have a recurrence a few years later? If so, it is likely that it was not properly built and/or repaired. In most installations, the shower stall is constructed with an underlying one-piece flexible membrane of PVC that is attached to the wall studs before the backer board and wall tile is installed. No nails or screws should penetrate the membrane below the level of the curb of the shower stall. The only opening in the membrane below the curb must be the hole for the shower drain to connect to the house plumbing. The shower drain is designed to allow water on top of the membrane to flow into the drain via weep holes for that purpose. Read More

Type ofLoss

Not sure what you're looking for?
Browse All

Select Loss Category